Zimbabwe News and Internet Radio

Stacy Macheso happy with new music

By Tafadzwa Zimoyo

It is true when they say that the apple does not fall far from the tree.

Stacy Macheso and father Alick macheso
Stacy Macheso and father Alick Macheso

Rising afro-pop musician Stacy Macheso who is daughter to legendary sungura musician Alick Macheso has promised more good music as she continues to entrench her position in the local music industry.

The talented vocalist whose latest single “Amai” is rocking the airwaves and the video to it getting airplay on the national broadcaster ZBCTV.

The 19-year-old told The Youth Interactive section that she is buoyed by her success and it was all systems go.

“I am really impressed by the reception and support from the industry and I just can’t wait to unleash more good music. The feedback is amazing and highly encouraging.

I have also picked some very important pointers from fans and music critics which I hope to infuse in my coming project which is going to be a full album,” she said.

Stacy’s latest single “Amai” is a follow up to her 2020 debut single titled “Ingozi” which amazed over 100 000 views on YouTube with limited marketing.

“Amai is a follow up to my debut production “Ingozi” in 2020 which did well on the market in view of the little marketing we gave it. The song had over 100 000 views and music lovers are also growing interest in it following the production of the new single Amai.

“I am happy to say “Amai” is a more complete project which came with a supporting video and we have amassed over 20 000 views in less than one week and for someone who is fairly new in the game I am more than encouraged by the outcome. Our hope is to reach a million views with it,” she said.

Stacy who is also a gifted songwriter and mbira player said that she is learning to play the guitar and hope to one day have a special performance with her father.

“I write all my music and I am actually putting together songs for my next album which I hope to release in the not so distant future. I am a very comfortable mbira player and I am currently learning to play the rhythm guitar on acoustic.

My dream is to one day perform with my dad and elder brothers who are also finding their way into the music industry. In the same vein, I am not ruling out collaboration with my dad on the next album,” she said.

The Macheso girl who is still in school said she is hoping to use her music to advocate against various social ills that have worked against development and the emancipation of the marginalised.

“I want to produce music with meaning and I am deliberately writing songs that speak to our everyday challenges like drug abuse, sexual abuse, gender based violence and infusing that with other feel good topics that add value to the moral fabric of society.

I am open to any engagements that add value to the work of local brands and organisations and I have made myself available on social media platforms like Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and Twitter for ease of communication and access to my music. I also want my music streamed across all platforms,” she said.

While some musicians have failed to grow their art and brands because of lack of professionalism and poor management, Stacy said she is putting together a team of professionals to take her music and brand to the international stage.

“I don’t want to be a fly by night musician. I am here to stay and for that reason I am putting together a professional management team with the pedigree to take my brand places.

Talent alone is not enough so I hope my team will compliment my talent with the professional brand management attributes. We need to be dynamic and follow trends so that we don’t get left out,” she said.

The rising songstress also urged fellow musicians to take heed of lockdown regulations and explore ways of marketing their work and earning online so that the pandemic is contained.

“I am really saddened that the music industry is one of the hardest hit because of the lockdown situation and my prayer is that we abide by the set regulations to contain the pandemic.

We must explore ways of staying relevant and earning through our music and that way we can sustain our careers. I would have loved to be performing my new music but unfortunately conditions do not allow,” she said. The Herald

Comments