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Parirenyatwa hospital in trouble for amputating leg of weeks old baby

A Zimbabwean woman is demanding an explanation from the Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals for circumstances that led to the amputation of her newly born baby’s leg.

The woman identified as Tiny Masvaure is, according to her lawyers, arguing it was the “unfortunate neglect and abuse of the baby by the hospital staff despite the protestations of the mother” that led to her baby’s other leg being infected and eventually amputated in January last year.

She engaged Paidamoyo Saurombe of the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights (ZLHR) to demand from one Zimbabwe’s biggest hospitals why her child was amputated in less than a month of being born.

Saurombe argues the hospital staff breached Section 19(2)(c) of the Constitution which obliges State authorities to protect children from maltreatment, neglect or any form of abuse.

“At Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals, authorities have landed themselves in trouble after a newly born baby had her leg amputated less than 1 month after being born.

“Tiny Masvaure ended up staying at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals for more than 3 months in an isolated ward after her baby, now aged 1 year and 4 months-old, had her leg amputated on 19 January 2021 because the leg had been infected,” ZLHR said in a statement.

The ZLHR recently wrote a letter of complaint to the hospital and to the Ministry of Health protesting and arguing that the unfortunate neglect and abuse of the baby by the hospital staff despite the protestations of the mother, had led to the minor’s leg being amputated.

“Saurombe asked the hospital to provide Masvaure with all hospital records regarding her baby, all minutes on the investigations conducted on how the minor came to be amputated, provide a prosthetic leg for the baby and a comprehensive compensation plan for past and future medical expenses incurred and to be borne by the minor.

“Saurombe argued that according to Section 62 of the Constitution, which provides for access to information, Masvaure is entitled to be furnished with the requested information.

“In addition, Saurombe said Section 19(2)(c) of the Constitution obliges State authorities to protect children from maltreatment, neglect or any form of abuse. He said failure to positively respond to Masvaure’s demands will leave him with no option but to employ legal measures to obtain the requested medical records.” Nehanda Radio

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