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Two arrested for fraud in connection with Alph Lukau’s coffin ‘resurrection’

By Nomahlubi Jordaan | TimesLive |

Two people have been arrested in connection with the hoax resurrection video flighted in February by pastor Alph Lukau’s Alleluia Ministries International.

South Africa based prophet Alph Lukau might be trending over a viral video of him claiming to have raised a Zimbabwean man from the dead on Sunday, but the Funeral Parlour whose hearse was hired has rubbished the claims and is now taking legal action over the “malicious damage” to its image.
Pastor Alph Lukau claimed to have resurrected a Zimbabwean national Brighton Moyo

National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) spokesperson Phindi Louw-Mjonondwane confirmed to TimesLIVE on Tuesday afternoon that two people were arrested on fraud charges in connection with the alleged resurrection.

“They are in custody. They will be appearing in the Johannesburg Magistrate’s Court (soon) to apply for bail,” she said.

Police spokesperson Capt Mavela Masondo said in March that SAPS was investigating three cases of fraud opened in connection with the “resurrection” incident.

“One case was opened by a funeral parlour based here in Gauteng, another case was opened by people who said they were concerned citizens, and a third one was opened by pastor Mboro [Paseka Motsoeneng],” said Masondo.

Mboro had staged a protest at Lukau’s offices for “bringing Christianity into disrepute” and opened a case at the Sandton police station.

Kings and Queens funeral parlour denied any knowledge of the deceased or selling the coffin to the church.

Brighton Moyo, the man falsely “brought back to life”, has meanwhile died of pneumonia in his home country of Zimbabwe, TimesLIVE reported this week.

There he was known as Thabiso Mlanje, 28.

According to Vincent, this was not the first stunt Brighton had been a part of as he’d previously allegedly pretended to be wheelchair-bound so that the pastor could “heal” him in front of the masses.
According to Vincent, this was not the first stunt Brighton had been a part of as he’d previously allegedly pretended to be wheelchair-bound so that the pastor could “heal” him in front of the masses.

Initially dubbed “Elliot” by Alleluia Ministries, he had on a previous occasion been “healed” from being confined to a wheelchair, a colleague of his said.

Moyo, who according to his family had been in SA since 2011, had been employed by a customised door manufacturing company prior to going missing after the “resurrection” hoax.

The church had denied knowing in advance that it was a “fake miracle”.

“At no stage did pastor Alph claim that he resurrected the person shown in the video, who was identified to him as Elliot. From the video footage, it is clearly stated that when the mortuary vehicle arrived at the church premises, there was already movement in the coffin.

“Prior to even praying for Elliot, pastor Alph states that Elliot is in fact breathing,” said the church in statement issued at the time the scandal first broke.