Zimbabwe News and Internet Radio

Randburg court in stitches as Duduzane Zuma’s lawyer shouts ‘Mshini Wam’

By Siphumelelo Khumalo

Johannesburg – There was a humorous ending to Duduzane Zuma’s court proceedings when his lawyer shouted “Mshini Wam” in court, leaving people in stitches.

Duduzane Zuma with his lawyer Advocate Mike Hellens SC. File Picture: Karen Sandison/African News Agency(ANA)
Duduzane Zuma with his lawyer Advocate Mike Hellens SC. File Picture: Karen Sandison/African News Agency(ANA)

Advocate Mike Hellens SC, blurted out the words as soon as the matter was postponed, resulting in former president Jacob Zuma, who was in court to support his son, breaking into a smile.

As people filed out court, some tried to get closer to the former statesman but his vigilant bodyguards shoved everyone aside.

He did not speak to the media as he made his way to the waiting car.

Duduzane’s case which was heard at the Randburg Magistrates Court early on Thursday was later postponed.

The State and Zuma’s legal counsel made representations to the court to decide if the state should prosecute him.

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) had initially decided not to prosecute former president Jacob Zuma’s son after AfriForum’s Private Prosecution Unit applied to privately prosecute him.

However, the NPA later went ahead and prosecuted him.

Duduzane faces one charge of culpable homicide and another of reckless and negligent driving relating to a car crash on February 1 2014 on the M1 in Johannesburg.

Zimbabwean national, Phumzile Dube, died after Duduzane’s Porsche rear-ended the minibus taxi she was in.

Duduzane pleaded not guilty to the culpable homicide charge and negligent driving.

He said he was not driving negligently when his car crashed into the and that hat a water puddle caused him to lose control of his Porsche

State Prospector Yusuf Baba argued that Zuma could have easily avoided the accident by lowering his speed of his vehicle and that had he been paying attention to the road, he would been able to see the puddle which contributed to him losing control of his car.

However Helen’s argued that because it was raining heavily, and he was only traveling at approximately 90km per hour, there was no way he could have avoided the fatal crash. The Star