Zimbabwe News and Internet Radio

Man kills sister, nephew over R20

A man accused of killing and mutilating his sister and nephew over R20 has abandoned his bid for bail. Sisipho Pita (25) appeared in the Tembisa Magistrates Court in Ekurhuleni on Wednesday.

October 16 2018 Nokulunga Pita, 46, comforted by a fellow church member, Nonhlanhla Nkala, 56. Pita's son allegedly killed his sister and her 13-month-old son. (Pic Veli Nhlapo/Sowetan)
October 16 2018 Nokulunga Pita, 46, comforted by a fellow church member, Nonhlanhla Nkala, 56. Pita’s son allegedly killed his sister and her 13-month-old son. (Pic Veli Nhlapo/Sowetan)

Pita, who walked barefoot into the court wearing a purple jersey and grey pants, did not look at the packed gallery where his relatives and neighbours were sitting.

Magistrate Amanda Ludick postponed the case to November 28.

Pita allegedly killed his sister Fundiswa Pita, (28) and her 13-month-old son Lwasanga on Monday morning in a rented back room in Tembisa which they shared.

According to relatives, he was found sitting next to the bodies while a knife he used in the attack was lying at his feet.

Fundiswa’s bloodied body was found on the floor while the toddler’s body was found on the bed.

Her throat had been slit, and her left eye and an index finger were missing.

Lwasanga’s male organ was also missing.

Fundiswa’s other child, Bayanda (10) was at school at the time of the attack.

Police spokesperson Captain Nelsah Sekgobela said the suspect confessed to the Tembisa police that he killed his sibling and nephew after they had fought over R20.

He then gave the police his sister’s index finger which he had hidden in his buttocks.

He, however, claimed that his sister’s eye and his nephew’s organ were eaten by rats after he threw them through the window.

His uncle Nkosinathi Pita said the incident had shocked the family.

“We are caught between a rock and a hard place. On the other hand I want the law to take its course and again I want him to obtain bail and tell me why he did what he did.”

He described his nephew as a quiet, intelligent and respectable man.

“I don’t know why he did that. I raised them together as my own children following their father’s death. I’m asking myself what went into his mind. To date I can’t believe what happened. He owes me answers.”

Fundiswa was the family’s breadwinner and was looking after her unemployed mother and her two children as well as her brother. — Sapa